Installing Magento 2 on Red Hat Openshift

Openshift is brilliant. Mostly because it’s free, but also for it’s more advanced features like being able to deploy your website simply pushing your master branch from git.

Red hat Openshift

Getting back to it being free, there are obviously limitations in the scope of the gears (I think of gears as servers). In trying to setup Magento 2 I came up to those limitations. According to How to Install Magento 2 on Openshift;

  • Magento 2 requires PHP 5.5+ and OpenShift currently has official cartridges of up to PHP 5.4
  • Magento 2 requires shit loads of space, and OpenShift free gears are limited to 1GB
  • Magento 2 requires MySQL 5.6+ and OpenShift currently supports up to MySQL 5.5 official cartridges

After following this excellent set of instructions, we managed to launch a full fledged Magento 2 store, hosted for free here. All you’ll need is a free openshift account, and the OpenShift Client Tools.


# Create a new OpenShift app with NGINX as web server
# Replace "123" by your actual api key & secrets and
# $myapp with your preferred app name.

# Write down the “Git Remote” ssh url that will be shown once the command finishes.
rhc create-app $myapp http://cartreflect-claytondev.rhcloud.com/github/boekkooi/openshift-cartridge-nginx API_KEY=123 API_SECRET=123

# Install PHP 5.6 cartridge into the app
rhc cartridge add -a $myapp http://cartreflect-claytondev.rhcloud.com/github/boekkooi/openshift-cartridge-php

# Install mysql-5.5 cartridge into the app
rhc cartridge add -a $myapp mysql-5.5

# Clone our repository and push it to your app, we will take care of everything for you.
git clone https://github.com/javilumbrales/magento2-openshift
cd magento2-openshift

# Remember to replace $myapp by your app’s name and YOUR_GIT_REMOTE by your actual repository url, the one that you got when you created the app (ie. should be something like ssh://*******@magento2-mage2.rhcloud.com/~/git/yourappname.git/)
git remote add $myapp YOUR_GIT_REMOTE
git push $myapp master -f

Magento is hard

Free open source ecommerce platform helping you sell online

I’m not going to lie, Magento is hard. The codebase contains 30,000 files. It’s like WordPress’s much more sophisticated older sibling. It’s modular and designed to be chopped up and hacked so long as that is done in the right way. There are plenty of wrong ways.

If you need to run a website on your local mac, you’re going to need to follow read “Installing Nginx in Mac OS X Maverick With Homebrew“.

That should give you what you need to then attempt to install Magneto for the first time. To be fair, that part is quite easy. It’s when you lift up the hood and catch sight of all those olden days cogs and whirring moving parts that you realise that there’s a lot more to Magento than a shopping cart.

Starting a new job

I’m starting a new job today. I have much and varied experience of starting new jobs. I’ll not lie, I’m 42 years old and I’ve never had a single job that I’ve been in for 12 months.

Don’t judge me. I know it’s not a good look on your CV and all that, but that’s who I am. I’m a kid whose first taste of work was freelancing a website for the local photo printing shop who had noticed me come in with my PhotoShop creations when I was at Newcastle University studying psychology in 1995 (ish). I’ve been a freelancing cut & paste script kiddie ever since. Going with the most interesting and highest paying jobs and standing on the shoulders of giants, a career in front end web development isn’t like the olden days.

Likesay I’ve started many new jobs both good and bad in that time. I hope for a good one this time around. They’re a great company who specialise in ecommerce sites using magento have taken the time to properly recruit a front end developer they feel will be a good fit in their company culture and I’m ready to engage with that. Hi ho.

Magento: eCommerce platforms and solutions for selling online